Monday, April 29, 2019

Death Valley.




"A mining town without a mine is usually referred to as a ghost town," said Ballarat Panamint Range. bye





RIP John Singleton. 

Literally insane that you have died at 51. Wow. Life is way too short. Rest In Peace. Your work is, and will always be, remembered. You were a true pioneer in the film indie movement.
         bye.

Sunday, April 28, 2019

#Fassbinder streaming.

                              

                              

#CriterionChannel
#Rainer-aheadofhistime

Patti Smith



Daylight 'Savings' Time.


Saturday, April 27, 2019

Not Sugarfree, but Delightful. 

       

The 1973 film, ‘Turkish Delight’ truly did poetic justice to the original 1969 Dutch novel by painter/sculptor/author Jan Wolkers (his novel was translated into a dozen languages). I managed to get my hands on an out-of-print European copy of the film yesterday for viewing and was immediately hypnotized by its utter uninhabited rawness. This film was awarded ‘Best Movie of the Century’ in Amsterdam, and I can see why- it’s pure energy, honest, raw and sincere in its delivery. The movie was shot handheld and with a very loud Arriflex 16mm camera, a camera that has a synch motor so loud that it inevitably had to have ALL of its dialogue dubbed in by the actors after photography was completed. This film is what ‘Love Story’ was in the U.S. minus the catchphrase ‘love is never having to say you’re sorry’... in this Dutch rendition of true love it’s all about having a sweet tooth with a hospital’s Turkish pastry.

                          
                                                p.s. kinda funny to think this director (Paul Verhoeven) went on the make such Hollywood blockbusters like RoboCop, Basic Instinct, Starship Troopers and Total Recall.  At age 80, his most recent film Elle was superb and a true return to his raw-cinema storytelling roots.

                                   bye.


Crayola Beard.



#contemporarymobiledeliverysystems
#colormeblind
#leprechaunsbeattrafficjams

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Spaghettification



April 27, 1435: First group of Romani people arrive in Basque Country


https://www.featureshoot.com/2019/04/honoring-the-romani-people-in-photographs/











https://basquebooks.blogs.unr.edu/april-27-1435-first-group-of-romani-people-arrive-in-basque-country/








The Romani (colloquially known as Roma or Gypsies) have been a long established presence in the Basque Country and even developed their own distinct tongue, Erromintxela, which is a mixed language that incorporates most of its vocabulary from Kalderash Romani and its grammar from Basque. The first documented presence of the Romani in the Basque Country dates from April 27, 1435 when a group of fifty people passed through Olite, Navarre, on a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. The group was led by "Thomas, the Count of Lower Egypt," and received a donation from Blanche I, Queen of Navarre.


Document signed by Miguel García de Barasoain, secretary to Queen Blanche I of Navarre, detailing the donation, 1435.


Tuesday, April 23, 2019

R.I.P. Rawlings (and Horner)

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-rawlings-dead-was-film-editor-alien-blade-runner-chariots-fire-1204021
                 
                  
                                        Excellent new podcast called SCORE, about film sound scoring and design!


p.s.  Also, remembering the unforgettable work of composer James Horner (rip) after his plane crash. ..
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/james-horner-dead-titanic-composer-804365


Monday, April 22, 2019

Daily Conservative Poker Face Yoga Recital.


re·cit·al
/rəˈsīdl/
    noun
  1.          1an enumeration or listing of connected names, facts, fake news or imaginary elements.

  2.         "a recital of their misfortunes"


          synonyms: enumerationlistlitanycatalogCNN hostsdetailing, itemizing, specification, Boston bomber terrorists being allowed to vote.


a sad greedy$ demolition derby

https://www.boweryboogie.com/2019/04/demolition-of-sunshine-cinema-is-underway/

                                          

Bye Bye, sweet Sunshine :(
#neverforget

Sunday, April 21, 2019

Happy Easter🐰 Day 



MONDO releases John Williams' masterpiece
double-vinyl film score JAWS, re-mastered 2019!
















p.s. Actress Susan Backline, first human to be devoured in the movie JAWS and also she's a real-life wild animal wrangler by trade...

 
 
 
 



Before Netflix: a Made For TV cult classic.



The Original Trailer:



Strange things blow in through my window on the wings of the night wind and I don't worry about my destiny.  

    Carl Sandburg 

A Made-For-TV movies history: In the 1970s, television networks began producing 90- to 120-minute TV movies as a new form of serialized television, and despite the low budgets and quick shooting schedules, managed to attract a lot of name talent whose schedules otherwise prevented them from committing to a television series. Many of them got big ratings; it was often that you could see a TV movie pull in one-third and even half of the television-watching public. However, increasing budgets and the rise of cable television led to a decline of quality to the point where the glory days were forgotten in favor of being Snark Bait among viewers for their low budgets, Strictly Formula plots, and bad acting. Nowadays, the Big Four prefer to be more conservative with budgets while TV movies are strictly done for cable, where many networks have more money to spend due to being light on in-house production. Also helping is that with many cable networks and websites getting into the series business, actors who in the past had to be content with taking a TV movie role in between jobs can happily reject them for a much more lucrative and satisfying role in a show guaranteed to make 10 episodes at the least rather than being reduced to paint-by-numbers Damsel in Distress fare; those that want to stick with TV movie-like roles can instead take work in much shorter true crime reenactment shows airing on Lifetime, Investigation Discovery, A&E and the network news magazines. A number of TV movies have been released theatrically overseas after airing in the United States. This was especially common in the 1970s to ensure that the studios made quicker profits on these movies. One such example is 'Duel', a 1971 suspense thriller starring Dennis Weaver directed by an up-and-coming young filmmaker named Steven Spielberg. A peculiar recent example is the Liberace Biopic Behind the Candelabra, which was reportedly rejected by US film studios for its gay subject matter, was made as a TV movie by HBO, and then did get a cinematic release in many overseas markets. In the United Kingdom, this is not called a "TV movie", but rather a "one-off drama", and is generally seen as being more serious and artistic than a series rather than the reverse, not unlike how OVAs are viewed relative to anime made for broadcast television. Until the late 80s/early 90s they were called "plays" and were often videotaped on multi-camera, which gave them a more theatrical look; occasionally they were even direct adaptations of works written for the stage. Sometimes they'd even end up spawning an ongoing TV series; Rumpole of the Bailey and The Bill can trace their origins back to one-off dramas included in The BBC's Play For Today and ITV's ITV Playhouse anthology strands respectively. In 2010 director Guillermo Del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, The Shape Of Water) remade the Made for TV movie 'Don't Be Afraid Of the Dark' adding CGI FX that ruined the frightening elements that the original tv movie had that included bad creature animation, very dark lighting (indirectly leaving room for ominous imagination) and a simplistic scary score based on noises that no contemporary MIDI device should try to mimic. Less is More...always. bye.

The Real Nighthawk.

Rutgher speaks carefully (he hated Stallone and the Hollywood industry) about his first US film NIGHTHAWKS...
His performance of Wulfgar is immeasurable and may partly be credited to all of the suffering that he endured during the making of this movie, some of which he describes here above. He also suffered a permanent physical injury from a special effect squid (squid: fake gun shot explosive) that exploded into his abdomen that burned straight into his internal organs. He asked Stallone to be very careful and when it occurred he couldn't forgive the irresponsible special effects crew. It happened when he filmed his first scene (the end death scene) and he carried this emotion throughout the shooting of the film. An epic action film that proves to be timely now due to our current state of heightened international terrorism awareness.

          bye.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Lanthimos is Greek and not from Utah.


'The Favourite' is a perfectly designed, crafted, shot, casted, sound recorded and lit film. Period - oops almost forgot and a crazy period piece, too.  bye .  ..
                          meeting with director/producer Joe Berlinger
                                         ( Sundance 2019 premiere )

'The Troubles' Northern Ireland UPDATE.


The city of Derry, Northern Ireland, was severely affected by the Troubles. The conflict is widely considered to have begun in the city, with many regarding the Battle of the Bogside (an inner suburb of the city) as the beginning of the Troubles. The 'Bloody Sunday' incident of 1972 occurred in Derry, in the bogside area. Bye.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

The Cremaster series.


The Cremaster Cycle films by the American conceptual artist Matthew Barney is like nothing I've seen in the cinema: an intercontinental, even intergalactic epic without story or words or characters in any normal sense. Even the longueurs , of which there are many, are on an awe-inspiring scale. This is an event movie like no other: an art-work that's too big for the refrigerated white-walled world of the gallery, and yet also too absurdly big for the cinema audito rium. Maybe it should be projected on to some vast plain the length of the Great Wall of China and audiences could blast off in a rocket ship and watch it from outer space. Its five constituent films, produced between 1994 and 2002, have been characterised by their author as filmic sculptures, though the Cremasters are to sculpture what physiology is to anatomy. The overall effect is like something by Busby Berkeley or Leni Riefenstahl, or perhaps a nightmare David Cronenberg could have after eating his bodyweight in Edam. It has something of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings with simultaneously much more, and much less of a sense of humour. And there's a hint of the "What happens during ejaculation?" section of Woody Allen's Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex. Cremaster is the name of the muscle governing the rise and fall of the testicles, and to the extent that any cogent meaning can be extracted at all from the Cycle, it is about fertility and male virility, with their concomitant fears and vulnerabilities, and the intricate ways in which biology is connected to, and analogous with art, music, architecture: all human endeavour. Barney himself appears in the films in various guises, with some very bizarre humanoid modifications in the genital area. He has the artist Cindy Sherman's interest in self-reinvention, and an heretical enthusiasm for messing with the homo sapiens template that reminded me of the artist Patricia Piccinini and her ultra-weird "cross-species" sculptures.Its images tumble, proliferate and cross-hatch; they are extravagant and loopy and defiantly enormous in their ambition, making everything else look petty and piddling. Do these strange kinetic sculptures need to mean something, need to fit into each other? As Lear said: reason not the need. Barney pulls off the remarkable trick of devising his own organic myth, which we come upon like an enigmatic tribal dance in a forest clearing, and which never makes the mistake, like Peter Greenaway's forthcoming The Tulse Luper Suitcases, of witteringly and tiresomely insisting on its own un-earned mythic status in advance. The Cremasters can be laughed at or laughed with or laughed off. But their energy and invention can't be denied, and neither, I think, can their strange, unworldly innocence. Can audiences be persuaded to go to see them? Well, the turnstiles at Tate Modern are clanging as people pour in to see challenging new art - of which video installations are always popular. And if people can enjoy David Blaine sitting motionless in a perspex box, how much more they could enjoy this. bye.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Monday, April 15, 2019